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obama weighed down by a jobless rate higher than any incumbent seeking re-election since fdr win 323 electoral votes, sweep 8 of 9 battleground seats? as the republican party picks up the pieces and looks ahead to 2016, here are lessons hopefuls from both parties might want to keep mind. if you don't define yourself, your opponent will do it for you. romney let the president's early attacks on his personal wealth and business background go largely unanswered. romney's campaign argued after a long and expensive primary, they had to choose how to spend at the time, limited funds, and they had to claim it was better than defenses of his personal record. in the end, obama beat romney by ten points. on the economic values question that was this, which candidate is more in touch with people like you. 53% said romney's polauolicies d favor the rich. just 10% said that about the president's policies. and romney, the first republican nominee in the history of our poll to go into a convention with his personal rating under water and campaign with a painful number, just 47% of voters viewing hi
presidential election in the united states. there were people people saying it's not this person. tim pawlenty drops off and michele bachmann drops off and left with a last person standing. it's not about picking a winner. it's picking losers. this is not the person. this is not the person. finally you get the last person standing. >> host: process of e elimination. >> which is consistent in whatever organization it is. i think it is in a sense is a simplified version of reality. i think you used a theory. theory start with simple and you make them more complex. if you take ge famous for the way it chooses lards. ge we always tell our students it's a company that works at practice but not in theory. it doesn't seem to do any of the things we say it should do. it's incredible profitable. if you have to pick them it's good at picking leaders. it's good at developing managers and picking the right people. ge spends twenty years selecting among the organization and slowly promoting them over and over and over again. and so the end of the day, twenty years, so you to work your way up. at the end of
the government, the government suggested you can have our election with them are in the class, and they did a film, and it's absolutely priceless. i mean, the parents, they didn't have to do it because the teachers were not shy to do it. they would make this mistake or that little thing and they would have this comical elements but the students got interested. they got interested. they ended up collecting a monitor. i'm how good the monitor was. but it was all right. it was all right. and so there are ways i think, which are more likely to think of that i am. of taking these different ideas and say try to settle here or try it out over there. you are building the bar, and it's true that there are, none of these things, everything has its drawbacks. move along. >> final two questions. this gentleman right here, and back their. >> ninety. i've been involved in studying practicing chinese law for the last 45 years. i just want to say on a positive note you, justice breyer and also i think others talked and plenty differently which about changing a legal culture in china. and it wanted to menti
>> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned children. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with the editor of a new anthology of verse: 100 poems written over 100 years. >> it doesn't have poetry. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: gunfire tore at the nation's holiday mood again today, with the emotional wounds from a school massacre still fresh. there were more fatal shootings, inclu
. >> it was the will of the house to do nothing? on thursday night, the members of the elected house of representatives decided it would you describe not their will to take a vote on their own leadership's proposal. it would have exempted the first million dollars of income from a tax increase. there was no chance of being passed into law as the president made clear he would veto it. if the speaker's plan b passed the democrat controlled senate. this was a republican proposal. house democrats would not have supported it. democrats couldn't agree to vote on it. instead, they walked out and went home for the holidays. forget about bipartisanship, this house couldn't achieve partisanship. as the speaker explained it, his fellow republicans wouldn't vote on the proposal because they didn't want to be perceived as tax raisers. now, the speaker is at a loss. >> many of us believe on both sides of the aisle, the tax code will help us get our economy working faster and put more americans back to work and more americans with tax rules. how we get there, god only knows. >> god only knows? mr. speaker, you're supposed to
at some of the most memorable presidential moments of this election year. >>> president obama and senate members will be here in washington tomorrow, but we'll be hearing crickets on the house floor. nbc news has learned the republican leadership has not given representatives the 48-hour notice to return to work, another sign of inaction on the fiscal cliff front. joining me now for our daily fix, mr. jonathan capehart, msnbc contributor and "washington post" editorial writer. jonathan, we're just six days away, no indication from house republicans that they are going to come back any time soon. the leadership has gone mum on that. we know there's not been communication between boehner and mcconnell, obama and boehner. are you amazed with this short amount of time to go there seems to be no sense of urgency on either side? >> am i amazed, given what we went through with the debt ceiling, no, i'm not amazed. i think there are forces here in this town that would like for us, sure people would like for there to be a deal, but going over the cliff on january 1st when there's this notion wher
was thinking slower-elect, you know what i'm saying? >> remember this humble moment. [laughter] say that one more time. >> what does it mean to you personally [inaudible] -- >> i think what it means to me personally is that 18 years ago the city of charleston county county-wide gave me an opportunity to represent him based on values and issues. a couple of years later the folks from the house gave me an opportunity to represent their issues and their values. two years ago the first district gave me an opportunity to represent their issues and values. what i've not ever heard on the campaign trail was besides the fact that you're black or because you're black, here's what we want to do. they've asked me questions about values and issues, and that's an amazing thing. i think it speaks to the evolution of south carolina and of our nation. it speaks to the heart of the good people in our nation and specifically of our state. i would say this -- more importantly than the complexion that i have, i think back to growing up in a single-parent household. i'd love to speak to the single moms out there
was the longest u.s. serving member. he was elected to the house of representatives in 1952 and the u.s. senate in 1958. two former staffers, ira schapiro and david corbin, talked about the senator's life. next on c-span, nikki haley. >> the first speaker is irish schapiro. -- ira shapiro. he played important roles in foreign intelligence surveillance and the completing of the metrorail system. during the clinton administration, it he served as a leading u.s. trader and .arned the rank of staff thaman he was described as antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. se
to you our senate- elect tim scott. >> thank you. \[applause] >> thank you. thank y'all very much. before we get started, i was thinking that this is a great day of celebration in many, many ways. but our nation still mourns. and i wanted to take a moment of silence for newtown, connecticut. if you'd join me, please. \[moment of silence] >> thank you. i will tell you that this is an exciting day for many, many reasons, but for me, the first thing i wanted to say is just thank you to my lord and savior, jesus christ, to be honest with you. \[applause] i believe that when you start out in a single-parent household with a mom who works 16 hours a day and you're looking at a future that doesn't look as bright and you're living in north charleston, south carolina, you build a strength that comes from ching the appreciation and understanding that is not about you, it's about your faith, it's about your family. and i love my mother, who's here with me, frances scott, and i'm very thankful to the good lord and to a strong mom who believes that sometimes love has to come at the end of a switch, an
elected, he would have strained things much better than they are now. that is part of the problem. host: what -- caller: character, honesty. host: mitt romney is your choice. caller: that is about it. host: patrick is next. caller: my political hero is president obama. host: why so? caller: he has gone through a lot. he has kept his cool during the course of the year. i look forward to him doing better. host: one thing that stands out as far as his accomplishments. caller: bringing the end to osama bin laden. i think he has done very well. he has been patient and the adult for working with the republicans that tried to make everything for the country. host: president obama amongst others being listed this morning from the phones and facebook and twitter. after thestory passing of senator daniel in a the washington times." host: the code of hawaii -- the governor of hawaii possibly been the replacement for daniel inouye, reported by cbs news. picking up on the remaining time and before the next senate, comes in. president obama spoke on friday and talked about the senator's service and h
conservative of senators elected. whole flood of liberal senators and then there was robert byrd. it was not his youthful membership that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 1964 and 1965. richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time. he got lucky. issues got resolved on civil rights. senator byrd gets on the leadership ladder and he rises. he becomes the whip in a stealth campaign. the idea of robert byrd as leader goes from being inconceivable to virtually inevitable. he has earned his way up to be leader. at the beginning of my book, he becomes leader and replaces mike mansfield, who is sort of an icon. no one thinks byrd can replace mike mansfield. but the truth is, no one thought that mike mansfield could replace lyndon johnson. that is certain the way things work. as my book starts, the first chapter is about byrd. it is entitled "the grind." he is hard-wo
'm the newly-elected president of the united states who has a legacy to think about why wooir take that chance? certainly my friends on capitol hill on the republican side of the aisle have come to the reerlization that the president is prepared to take them over the fiscal cliff which is why you have the boehner move. i don't understand why you'd want to start the presidency with the potential of going over a fiscal cliff that could potentially put us into a recession. why not work a deal for the short term. why not look to do something more broad based next year? >> it would be been good to do it two months ago but the reality is, there's always risk. realistically if we take 5 to be 10, 20 days. the markets panic over everything. i assume these are rational actors. even if the market goes down 3 or 4%, markets fluctuate all the time. it goes down one day and back the next week and the impact on the economy is the same thing as my decision to go out to dinner next week. >> i disagree with that statement. it goes down 3 or 4% and then a lot of wealth has been destroyed. >> but it comes back.
was first elected to the u.s. house in 2010. this is about 35 minutes. >> good morning and it is a great day in south carolina. it's a historic day in south carolina, because, you know, first of all, we all were saddened and surprised when senator demint told us that he was not going to continue in the u.s. senate. but i will tell you, as i've told many people, that the heritage foundation is blessed. he will lift them up to an amazing new level. it's a foundation that i have always had great respect for, and they could not have made a more perfect pick. in this decision and process that we went through, there is no replacing jim demint, there is no replacing him. there is no one that can fill his shoes. there is no one that can really carry on that torch. and i don't -- i think that says a lot about him. i think it says a lot about how he has changed the face of south carolina in the way that we have a lot to be proud of. but i also think this is a new day. and it is with great pleasure that i am announcing that i am appointing our next u.s. senator to be congressman, tim scott. [applause]
hit do it at the end of an election season, rather than at the middle, so -- >> the economy takes a hit. there are a lot of economists who believe. i guess i would put myself in this camp if we don't get this resolved for several months. and sometimes these political fights go on and on. because jessica is right, this is at the core of what these go parties believe in. i do think that the tax increases could possibly cause a dreaded double-dip recession. and that would really hurt families. >> so if we don't have to push the panic button new year's day, when does it harmful when you're sitting at home looking at this thinking what is going on? when does that person in peoria or boise feel the effects? >> i think starting at the end of the month, next month. and if these guys can't get it together we're going to have to totally change the family finances. because we don't know how much taxes we'll pay for the average middle class family, candy, we're talking about through the year. 2,000 to $2,500 increase on their tax bill. >> that is plenty more. steven, by the way, thinks they c
presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that are critical in the politics that develop, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative task to them. they tended to be oriented around history of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt, in the south and southwest that we see the rise of what we see by the 1970s is becoming to talk about as the religious right, the rise of evangelical involved in the clinical process in new and important ways. so thurmond was at the forefront of all of those issues in
up the news of this holiday. then, part two of our conversation about upcomingin elections: house races in illinois and south carolina, an high-profile politics in new jersey. we have two health stories. first, are annual mammogramswn necessary? betty ann bowser examines theil conflicting answers.or >> it's going to result in an excessive treatment required for people that delay getting their cancer detected.re >> ifill: plus, 2013 will be am pivotal year for the new health care reform law. ray suarez gets an update from julie rovner of npr. from the island of mindanao in the philippines, fred de sam lazaro profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity meas
election, there were people around the president of the united states with assault rifles. we put people in schools with the guns, what happens if there in the restroom and somebody breaks and from the front? how are they going to protect the children? how many children do we have to lose? host: thanks for the call -- let me share with you this photograph from "the new york daily news." a handful of students tried to flee and lanza shot teem. some of the other fallen students are in the photograph. because of the teacher process protection, most of her students survived a car. -- survived a the horror. asheville, north carolina, republican line. caller: i would like to say one thing and i think there is a connection that people are overlooking -- i think people especially recently and as far back as timothy mcveigh and the people who crashed into the tent -- twin towers, they are terrorists. terrorist attacks society by creating fear, mayhem, and everything else. is the united states overlooking this? are we creating terrorists? beene young people have t attacking people with assault rif
irregularities in the presidential election. on the radio show she said voter suppression was in full force in many states all over this country.s ar the first lady cited no specifics and prompted judicial watch to iss the fina following statement. mrs. obama's exhibitions of minority vote suppression or racially divisi and show a dangerous disregard for the troops. we are aware of no evidence of actual voter suppression.r if she has some issues to disclose. by the way, we have not heard from the justice department on this issue at all. given his history that we certainly would have if there waslth any incident of voter suppression. our next guest defense the tough voter id law say it is a paramount important that we protect the integrity of the process and make sure voter irregularities and voter fraud is eliminating. joining us now, attorney general of south carolina, great to have you with us.at first, your reaction to what the first lady had to sy. >> i obviously disagree with the first lady.with in every state i looked at, georgia, indiana are two states, section five, one is not a sec
've had the opportunity working with their folks in their states and all around the country, to elect some new people to the senate that are bringing the right ideas and some new voices to those principles that we know have made our country successful. and so i feel like as i leave the senate that we are leaving it better than we found it and that our focus now, despite the difficult challenges, is really on america and how we turn america around. i should spend a lot of time and most of my time on thanking my staff. i have to say that my greatest inspirations have come from the staff that i've had the opportunity to serve with in the house and the senate. as all of you know who are serving here in the senate, this country is being run by people in their 20's and 30's who get us so busy that they're having to follow us to meetings to tell us where we're going and what we'll be talking about. but it's incredible to see that these young people, particularly those that i've served with, have such a passion for our country and freedom, and they're willing to put it all on the baseline to make
's very clear now, mr. president, that the speaker's number one goal is to get elected speaker on january 3rd. the house is not even here. he's told me he'll give them two days to get back here, 48 hours, not two days, 48 hours. they don't even have enough of the leadership here to meet to talk about it. they've done it with conference calls. people are spread all over this country because the speaker is basically waiting for january 3rd. now, the president campaigned on raising taxes on people making more than $250 thou,000 a year. the bush tax cut will expire at the end of this year. obama was elected with a surplus of about three million votes. he won the election. he campaigned on this issue. again, the speaker can't take yes for an answer. the president has presented to him something that would prevent us from going over the cliff. it was response to something that the speaker gave them himself but i guess with the dysfunctional republican caucus in the house, even the speaker can't tell what they are going to do because he backed off even his own proposal. the house, we hear so ofte
contracts. state republicans approved it this month after voters repealed a similar initiative on election day. despite reimposing a measure that was rejected by popular vote, governor snyder said -- was among a number of controversial bills recently advanced by state republicans in michigan before their majority declines with a new legislative session next month. the chicago teachers union has filed a lawsuit accusing a city of discriminating against african-american teachers and staff through its effort to reform or shut down local schools. the federal suit says more than half of the tenured teachers who lost their jobs in the most recent wave of school closings were african-american, despite african-americans comprising just 30% of tenured teachers overall and 35% in the underperforming schools that wound up -- wind up being closed. the teachers' union is seeking an injunction to stop chicago mayor rahm emanuel from closing any more schools. the nra has confirmed plans to continue its campaign against a proposed u.n. treaty that would regulate the global arms trade. the general assembly
, what he said four years ago, whatever plan he had then is over with. this is a new election. the deal that he had a year ago, that does not count. for republicans and people to say they don't understand what's going on, i have a problem with that. the republicans deny anything he puts forward. the president left his vacation and came here. they're not being fair. republicans say they are christians. they're not. they did this during his last term and now are causing and all of us to suffer because they don't like the president. this is personal. this has nothing to do with raising taxes. this is a personal attack and i think it's a shame. we look like a third world country. we don't look like the united states. host: let's get a republican voice. our next caller is calling from west bloomfield, michigan, on the republican line. good morning. caller: i would like to get your thoughts on a balanced approach and have unbiased taxation by using a flat tax. that way you can calculate the amount of taxes we need for the deficit over 10 years. another point is to control the spending on enti
. in total, 16 states have passed restrictive voting laws that could shape the 2012 election, including the vital swing states of florida and pennsylvania. well, on monday, naacp president and ceo ben jealous made voting rights the center of his address to the group's annual convention in houston. >> we have a choice to make. we can allow this election to be stolen in advance, as politicians from pennsylvania and recently bragged about money thought no one was listening. talking about his state's voter id law. we can double down on democracy. and overcome the rising tide of voter suppression with a higher daughter of voter registration and mobilization and activation and protection. amy goodman: well, today we're joined by a leader of the civil rights movement who risked his life numerous times marching for the right of all americans to vote: 13-term democratic congressmember john lewis of georgia. he was a leader of the civil rights movement who marched side by side with dr. martin luther king. he served as chair of the student nonviolent coordinating committee, helped organize the fre
. >> schieffer: how long have you been in the congress gijust got elected to my second term, have been in public office for 18 years serving the good people throughout south carolina. >> schieffer: let me ask you first about the whole business with the national rifle association. their idea seems basically to be just add armed security to all of our nations' schools. do you think that's feasible or is it a good idea? >> the president has just established a committee to take a serious, holistic look at what we need to do as a nation to make sure that our kids are safe. to rush to judgment, i think, is a bit premature on what we should do. i think after we have the commit's report, we should take a very serious look at whatever it takes to keep our kids safe at school. we don't know what that is yet. we're just finishing the week of so many funerals, we should-- we should continue to pray for the family members. >> schieffer: but would you be in favor of changing some laws, like, for example, banning these assault weapons? >> i would love to see what comes out of the committee. i think with vice p
legislatures do more. the easy answer is a mythology has developed about the ability of the nra to kick elected officials out of office that is almost entirely untrue but is totally devastating to the work we're trying to do. this is a moment when we can draw attention to that. what happened over a period of decades is that there were power struggles within the organization and finally, early in the 1990s, their then high ranking official finally sort of said what a lot of folks in the nra had felt for a long time which is we should not be talking about gun policy issues as matters of protecting the right to go out and hunt or protecting yourself. this ultimately is about the right of free people to hold guns wherever they want because eventually the government might make a list, check it twice and come and take them away. ever since then, you've seen the organization not as the membership level but at the leadership level become more radicalized. after they won the supreme court case identifying a right to own a gun in your home for self-defense, the question i think for them was well, what do
through the disagreements. the notion that our elected leadership can't do the same thing is mind boggling to them. and needs to stop. >> i just have to repeat, congress, you are terrible at your jobs. i really don't like working with you. we're going to talk a bit later in the show about everybody hates congress and what we can do about that. but as much as the public hates congress, you really get the feeling that congress' approval rating among president obama is in the neighborhood of negative 75,000 percent. and yes, numbers geeks, not a real number. but he seems really tired of working with these people. but there is a way in which congress, and particularly congressional republicans may actually be helping president obama out right now. everybody's always known two things about the cliff. you're almost certainly going to get more taxes in a deal after you go over than in a deal before you go over it. that's because after you go over the cliff, taxes already go up for everybody. so anything you do, any reasonable deal congress reaches, it will be a big tax cut. but the other thing ab
. years that began with the 2003 recount and reended with re-election of president obama. if you could think of the adjective to describe these years what would it be? >> clearly interesting. challenging. sometimes totally frustrating. but also full of opportunities for the country. there was some good times during the twelve years laced together with some that weren't so good. 9/11, the anthrax scare. there were positive things as well, the election of president obama, i thought it was a positive statement for the country and moving forward in a way that we have tried to move forward out of face -- fiscal as by now we came out of a fiscal as by during the times. it's a hodgepodge during at love different things. i couldn't imagined to have been here during a better time. >> let me get deeper and ask you tell me what was the high point of the entire service? >> the high point was when we can work together. and maybe the single event that process that would embody that was the gang of fourteen. when we put together with john mccain i put together six other democrats and six other republ
of a compromise. >> the american people reelected president obama on election day. they also reelected a republican majority here in the house. in doing so they gave us all a mandate. it was not a mandate to raise taxes on families and small businesses. it was a mandate to work together to begin solving the massive debt that threatens our country's future. >> reporter: the house and the senate will both be back in session tomorrow and the president has said he expects them to quickly vote to pass legislation to avoid the fiscal cliff, if, he and the speaker are able to make a deal before it's too late. gregg: we'll be holding our breath. peter doocy, thanks. >> reporter: yeah. patti ann: the commander-in-chief also spent part of his holiday thanking the troops on a visit to a hawaiian military base. the president and first lady paying tribute to those here and abroad who risk their lives keeping us safe. he took time to honor their families as well. >> so many of you make sacrifices day in, day out on behalf of our freedom, on behalf of our security, and not only do those in uniform ma
saying you tried to get the president not to be re-elected. you failed in that effort. he said you don't have the clout that you had politically in this town in past debates. >> the american people, i know one thing about them, they value their freedom. when the reality of the consequences of what the politicians in this town and the media and elites want to do to their rights and take them away, i think they'll do what they've done historically, defend the freedom. the american public knows the scene of the crime, it's a criminal and a victim. all these politicians aren't there. they see people like mayor bloomberg, new york city, if you're rich and you're famous you get your permit, if you're a .300 hitter with the mets, you get a permit, a big developer, you get a permit, wall street executive, you get a permit, the mayor's buddy, you get your permit. if you're a guy in the bronx, most in need of protection, you're flat out of luck. we're about the average guy, the noncelebrity, the non .300 hitter. we're about the nondeveloper. the average guy in the country values his freedom, doe
there is a new prime minister in japan. he is shinzo abe, the japanese parliament elected him today five years after abe abruptly resigned from the job. he's japan's seventh prime minister in six years. alex reports from tokyo. >> reporter: a remarkable political comeback is now complete here in japan. shinzo abe is once again prime minister, elected in parliament on wednesday following his party's landslide victory in general elections earlier this month. he has now taken the reins and unveiled his cabinet as well, which includes former prime minister aso who is deputy prime minister as well as finance minister. as the 58-year-old abe returns to the top post he vacated in 2007, his to-do list this time is very long. front and center is the economy, which has sputtered along in japan for the better part of two decades and is in recession once again. many will be watching to see how abe handling heightened tensions with china, as the two countries spar over disputed islands, as well as north korea, which defied the international community recently launching a rocket that skirted japanese territ
approved same-sex marriage in november's elections. gay marriage is already legal in d.c. and six other states. >>> regrettable, politically motivated, saddening. these are all statements made by u.s. officials about russia's decision to ban americans from adopting russian children. russian president putin signed the ban into law friday. lawmakers there cite a history of abuse of russian children adopted by american families. however, many believe it was in retaliation against a law that president obama signed that imposes u.s. travel and financial restrictions on human rights abusers in russia. this morning, i spoke with carrie kayhill and asked if the chances of adopteding a 13-year-old boy from daniel in an orphanage in siberia, if she thinks her chances are over. >> i'm ever hopeful that things are going to change. i'm hopeful that better communication between both countries might cause putin to rethink the thing that he just signed. >> how far along were you in this process to adopt him before the ban went into effect? >> well, i'd already met daniel. i had lived over there for a f
. in the years leading up to the presidential election, the focus seems to be on barack obama's roots and his family and the fact that he wrote his own biography. now in your book "american tapestry," you put the focus on michele obama. tell us about how you got started doing that and what inspired you. >> i was writing about the first lady and the first family for the new york times which was something of an unusual assignment. typically the first family is covered by the white house reporters who chased the president around on air force one and in the briefing room and write about the first lady or first family when they have time that there was a sense in 2008 at the new york times and other newspapers too that we might want to do things differently and this first african-american family living in this house, this white house bill in part by slave labor, with slave labor would be written about regeneration to come and we wanted it to be part of documenting and chronicling that story. in january, before the inauguration, one of my colleagues was writing an article about the president and hi
, you cannot harass, you cannot intimidate. and before you make any changes in election laws dealing with registration, changing a precinct, local lines for any political position, you have to get pre-clearance from the department of justice or the federal district court in washington, d.c. so, the state of florida, for an example, never sought to get clearance to purge. and they're hiding behind there may be fraud. that's their own. amy goodman: you were on that selma to montgomery march. this. can you explain what happened, as we go back, what, almost half a century now? rep. john lewis: on march 7, 1965, a group of us attempted to march from selma to montgomery, alabama, to dramatize to the nation that people wanted to register to vote. one young african-american man had been shot and killed a few days earlier, in an adjoining county called perry county-this is in the black belt of alabama-the home county of mrs. martin luther king jr., the home county of mrs. ralph abernathy, the home county of mrs. andrew young. and because of what happened to him, we made a decision to march. i
democracy work." i said, by the way, will it be translated into chinese? the elections in this book are important for the chinese and i believe the chinese leadership would read this book. he said that they are in the middle of trying to do that right now. and sure enough, the book sold very well in china. and justice breyer went to china in june. he was very well received, talking about his book, including what i thought was a wonderful moment of poetic justice. on the cover here -- as you all know, here he is as the cover story. and that is interesting. what i find even more interesting is the date of this magazine is june 4. so, i thought to myself -- that might have been lost on the editor. so, it has thrilled me know wind that someone as imminent as justice breyer has become increasingly engaged on this topic. when we were talking earlier, he talked about during the conversation. and i said, "trust me, i am going to drag you into this thing every step of the way." if you ever lose your day job, you could be a permanent diplomat. we are very pleased to have him here today. where
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